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Medical Anatomy students attend Utah State University cadaver lab

Credit+to+Unsplash+for+the+photo%2C+editing+credits+go+to+Luis+G.
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Medical Anatomy students attend Utah State University cadaver lab

Credit to Unsplash for the photo, editing credits go to Luis G.

Credit to Unsplash for the photo, editing credits go to Luis G.

Unsplash.com

Credit to Unsplash for the photo, editing credits go to Luis G.

Unsplash.com

Unsplash.com

Credit to Unsplash for the photo, editing credits go to Luis G.

Katie B., Editor

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Fifty Layton high Students, part of a Medical Anatomy class boarded buses and headed to the Utah State Cadaver Lab for a field trip. On arrival, the students were  split into two groups. Each group would view different parts of the human anatomy on a cadaver. The first group was shown the chest cavity, the GI tract, the reproductive system, and the head and face. The second group viewed the complex structures of the arms and legs.

LHS students spent about 30 minutes in the lab. They were instructed by college professors or student interns who explained and answered student questions. Senior Jace Jones attended the field trip and agreed to an interview to relate the experience:

Q: What was the purpose of the field trip? How did it relate to the course curriculum?

A: “In Medical Anatomy, we study the human form and frame. This gave us a chance to see on a real person what we had been studying in class.”

Q: Did anyone get sick?

A: “Yes. A few students had to leave. We were told beforehand that if we felt sick to tell them and they would escort us out to the hall. Those that left were instructed to lay down in the hall.”

Q: Did you get sick?

A: “No, I volunteer in the ER at Lakeview Hospital. I’ve seen the results of some terrible accidents, but the worst accident I saw was when a grinder blew up and the patient was cut up all around his lips and cheeks.”

Q: Where do the cadavers come from?

A: “People donate their own bodies for research. The body is used for a year and then the lab gets new bodies.”

Q: What do you want to do in the future?

A: “Be a surgeon.”

Q: What was the most memorable part of the trip?

A: “Seeing a decapitated head. They can’t really study the head unless they remove it from the body.  When they study the head they have two choices for cutting into it. One cut involved cutting the face so you could lay it back and look underneath it and another choice for a cut is down the middle where the brain cavity is exposed.”

Q: What was most interesting?

A: “The intricacy of the human frame and how it naturally orders itself and how everything is connected. Also, the nervous system that runs through your whole body was so interesting!”

Q: What did you learn that you hadn’t known before?

A: “The nasal cavity- you only breath out of one side of your nostril at a time!”

The field trip to the Cadaver Lab offered a unique perspective to students who had only studied the human frame on paper and out of text books. By attending the field trip, many saw the active roles that muscles, bones, and cavities play in keeping the human body alive and functioning.

Katie B., Editor

My name is Katie and am a Junior at LHS. I serve as the Editor for the Newspaper, but am also involved with AP classes, volunteering in the ER department...

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Medical Anatomy students attend Utah State University cadaver lab